Wear & Care

Our products are meant to be worn all day and night*, so it’s important to follow a few simple guidelines as you wear and care for your device.

To keep your band clean and your skin happy, our board of certified dermatologists have outlined the following tips:

Keep it Clean

FOR ELASTOMER BANDS:

  • Regularly clean your band and wrist—especially after working out or sweating. Rinse the band with water or wipe it with a small amount of rubbing alcohol. Do NOT use hand soap, body soap, dish soap, hand sanitizers, cleaning wipes or household cleaners which could get trapped beneath the band and irritate skin. Always dry the band well before putting it back on.
  • To remove build-up of lotions and oils (such as sunscreen, insect repellent and moisturizers) that can be trapped beneath the band, we recommend that you use a soap-free cleanser like Cetaphil Gentle Skin Cleanser or Aquanil, rinse thoroughly, and dry well.
  • For tough spots, stains or buildup on your band, scrub with a wet soft-bristled toothbrush.

FOR LEATHER BANDS:

  • Wipe down the band with a non-abrasive, lint-free cloth. If needed, you can lightly dampen the cloth with water. Leather bands aren't sweat or water resistant. Soaking them might cause discoloration or other damage.
  • Let the band air dry. Direct sunlight, high temperatures and humid conditions can cause discoloration or damage over time.
  • Limit exposure to substances like perfume, insect repellent, oil, lotion or dyed materials like denim to reduce discoloration and damage.

FOR METAL BANDS:

  • Wipe down the band with a non-abrasive, lint-free cloth. If needed, you can lightly dampen the cloth with water. Metal bands aren't sweat or water resistant. Soaking them might cause tarnishing, discoloration or other damage.
  • Dry the band with a recommended cloth. High temperatures and humid conditions can cause damage.
  • Limit exposure to substances like perfume, insect repellent, oil or lotions to reduce discoloration and damage.

Keep it Dry

  • While Fitbit devices are water resistant*, it’s not good for your skin to wear a wet band for long periods of time.
  • If your band gets wet—like after sweating or showering—rinse and dry it thoroughly before putting it back on your wrist.
  • Be sure your skin is dry before you put your band back on.

Don’t Wear It Too Tight

  • Make sure your band isn’t too tight. Wear the band loosely enough that it can move back and forth on your wrist.
  • If you use Fitbit Charge HR™, Fitbit Blaze™ or Fitbit Surge™, for better heart rate readings during exercise, we suggest wearing the band so it’s secure, but not too tight, and wearing the band higher on your wrist (about 2-3 finger widths above your wrist bone). Lower the band on your wrist and loosen it after exercise. Learn more.

Give Your Wrist a Rest

  • Prolonged rubbing and pressure may irritate the skin, so give your wrist a break by removing the band for an hour after extended wear.

Other Tips

  • If you have eczema, allergies or asthma you may be more likely to experience a skin irritation or allergy from a wearable device.
  • Whether you have the conditions above or not, if you start to experience redness or skin irritation on your wrist, remove your device. If symptoms persist longer than 2-3 days of not using your device, contact a dermatologist.
  • If you sweat for more than two hours while wearing your Fitbit band, be sure to wash your band and your wrist using the directions above to avoid skin irritation.

*Excludes leather and metal accessory bands.

Meet Our Scientific Advisory Board

As part of our commitment to help people live healthier, more active lives we have created a Scientific Advisory Board of leading, certified dermatologists who meet with Fitbit executives to review our testing protocols, ensure our products meet the highest possible standards, and to help us better communicate with our customers on how to properly wear & care for our bands.

Dr. Peter Schalock

Assistant Professor of Dermatology at Harvard Medical School

Dr. Peter Schalock is an Assistant Professor of Dermatology in the Harvard Medical School and an Assistant Dermatologist at Massachusetts General Hospital with over 11 years of experience. A former member of the American Contact Dermatitis Society Board of Directors, he currently chairs the ACDS taskforce developing clinical recommendations for evaluating implanted metal hypersensitivity reactions in patients.

Dr. Patricia Norris

Assistant Professor of Dermatology at Oregon Health & Science University

Dr. Norris is an Assistant Professor of Dermatology and Director of the Contact Dermatitis Clinic at Oregon Health & Science University with more than 15 years of experience. She also serves on the Board of Directors for the American Contact Dermatitis Society and is a member of the Women’s Dermatology Society. She is a former board member and past president of the Oregon Dermatology Society and Fellow at the American Academy of Dermatology.